Illegal dumping of products increases risk for highway traffic and wildlife

Submitted by Cpl. Jason Nash
Valemount Detachment

Grain pile at Clemina Creek
Grain pile at Clemina Creek
Submitted photo
Since May of this year the Valemount RCMP and CVSE have been monitoring Highway 5 rest areas of Clemina Creek, Allan Creek, and Chappel Creek for commercial vehicles dumping grain, oats, and other products for various reasons.

Activity of this nature can have a negative environmental impact. In recent years we have seen animal collisions with bear and deer increase in these areas as they are attracted to the easy source of food. One such injured bear was seen bleeding from the head last season while feeding on a pile of grain.   

In recent weeks RCMP have been able to identify multiple suspect vehicles, drivers, and companies participating in this illegal activity. Fines have been issued in some cases, and efforts made to have these areas cleaned of dumped piles. Further investigation will continue jointly between the RCMP, CVSE, and Conservation. The public are asked to report to police if they witness any such dumping of this nature along Highway 5 and 16.

Roving Traffic Service helps snag illegal drugs and weapons

Specialty Drug Dog “Dale”, whose handler is Cst. Eric Thomson of Roving Traffic Services.
Specialty Drug Dog “Dale”, whose handler is Cst. Eric Thomson of Roving Traffic Services.
Submitted photo
During the week of July 23 - 28 the Valemount and McBride RCMP were complimented with assistance from the Roving Traffic Service Unit and speciality drug dogs. These units offer a unique and beneficial service to the area and highways. It is anticipated more frequent and future visits to the area will assist with controlling the flow of illegal drugs and weapons via Highway 5 and 16.    

On July 27 during a traffic stop involving the Roving Traffic Service Unit the adult male and female occupants were arrested and subsequently held for court and transported to Prince George. Located in the vehicle, with assistance of a police dog, was a loaded handgun, rifle, a quantity of valuables, cocaine and fentanyl.

RCMP acquires Automatic License Plate Recognition equipment

The Robson Valley Regional RCMP (Valemount and McBride Detachments) recently received a new piece of equipment to assist with patrols of Highway 5 and 16, an Automatic License Plate Recognition (ALPR) System.

The ALPR goal is to reduce auto theft and motor vehicle violations, in particular those related to prohibited, suspended, unlicensed and uninsured drivers. The ALPR program assists in the recovery of stolen vehicles, property and related vehicle criminality.

During the first week of use in the area approximately 1000 vehicles have been scanned.   u