Dianne St. Jean

Or should we say… The Devil’s in the Details?

Luckyville – a Play about Money and Revenge - is a little bit of a different flavor from Sharon Stearn’s usually more upbeat and humour-filled works.

Luckyville

Main character Delia returns to hometown Luckyville after thirteen years’ absence and $100 million from a lottery win, as well as an agenda.

Blaming her estranged husband Larry for the death of their eight-year-old daughter back then, Delia entices her old friends with a salacious offer - $40 million for the dilapidated and dying town, plus $10 million each, that is, if and to whomever will do away, literally, with Larry.

This is Delia’s way of seeking revenge for their daughter’s death, as well as punishment of her friends for their duplicity and complicity in letting Larry get away with what she perceives to be… murder.

You see, Larry was driving drunk at the time while their daughter Angelica was riding in the back seat of the car.

Although all the friends witnessed Larry getting into the driver’s seat, when he lied to the cops about who was driving (and was helped to cover up by one of the friends who is a cop) they remained silent.

And, of course, who do you think he said was driving? Delia, of course.

Luckyville

 

Luckyville

Luckyville

But the most interesting character in the play is not Delia, or Larry, or the friends, not even Angelica or her angel Tammy, although they were delightful. Rather, it is the subtly persuasive shadow of a companion, Bruno.

Bruno is supposedly a friend and/or bodyguard of sorts to Delia, who appears to do her every bidding. But does he? Or, does she do his?

Bruno is in the background, carefully heeding Delia’s desires – except when there appears to be the slightest caving in on her part in her decision to make everyone pay for what happened. Then, a gentle reminder of her pain and loss, and a reminder that ‘justice’ must be done, to put Delia back on track – the track of revenge, blame, and bitterness.

So who is this Bruno? Can we say, perhaps our darker selves, or, as some have surmised – the devil himself? An interesting concept for a couple of reasons.

First, Delia states that it was Bruno who sought her out after her windfall.

And look at the handiwork – friends in a flurry of flaw-flinging at each other, even and especially the seemingly righteous Ruby, who takes pride in pointing out everyone else’s faults because, it appears, she seemingly has none of her own. Could that attitude in itself be a flaw?

Two poignant points that wind up the story – first, the replaying of the accident, in which we discover that it was Delia who grabbed the wheel just prior to the crash… hmm. And finally, at the end, Angelica being reunited with her father. No blame, only joy, and the gift of being loved for who you are. Together Larry and his daughter walk away into the Light.

And that, folks, makes you wonder, what really qualifies one to enter the Light? Flawlessness? Perfection? Who then can stand?

As they say, the devil’s in the detail.

 

Luckyville – A Play About Money and Revenge is a production of Wishbone Theatre. Inspired by Frederich Durrenmatt’s Play THE VISIT. Written and directed by Sharon Stearns.

Special thanks for funding support to: Columbia Basin Trust & CKCA; Dunster Community Forest; McBride Community Forest; Valemount Community Forest.